Sports and the Arts

As I write this, football is preparing for its bowl and playoff extravaganzas, basketball is under way, films with Oscar aspirations are opening, and ballet companies are seeking solvency via The Nutcracker. It’s a time when craft fairs abound, choirs carol, galleries display, theaters thrive, and Santa’s incredible delivery schedule once again eclipses his postal…

Consciousness Research, Educational Practice

John Dewey, Jean Piaget, and B. F. Skinner helped shape 20th century educational policy and practice by connecting teaching and learning to emerging cultural and scientific developments. Recent dramatic advances in the cognitive neurosciences and computer technology suggest that a similar set of creative educational theorists will soon emerge to help schools connect teaching and…

A Conversation With Alison Gopnik

Most parents have, at one time or another, gazed lovingly at their newborn child and wondered whether someday their offspring would grow up to be the next Einstein or Newton. If Alison Gopnik were watching, she might suggest that the newborn in the bassinet doesn’t need to grow up. Perhaps they already think like a…

A Social Brain Deserves A Democratic Classroom – Part 2

Last month’s column focused on the social nature of our brain, both in its modular organization and extended development. This column will argue that a collaborative classroom management model provides the best school venue for enhancing the brain maturation of students. A Democratic Society, A Democratic Classroom Authoritarian governments have dominated much of human history.…

A Conversation With Howard Gardner

Powerful ideas have universal impact. The concept of Multiple Intelligences, for example, started as a theory in the halls of Harvard University and has now grown to be one of the most influential movements in teaching practices in the 20th century. Instead of seeing the mind as possessing finite quantities of a substance known as…