A Conversation With Marian Diamond

The photographs and worn books that adorn Dr. Marian Diamond’s office are a sharp contrast to the spare concrete corridors of the Valley Life Sciences Building at the University of California at Berkeley. And Dr. Diamond herself, an elegant woman with silver hair and a warm smile, is a pleasant contrast to the competitive and…

A Conversation With Bruce McEwen

In the life cycle of an academic research scientist, developmental maturation usually consists of achieving a secure tenured position, establishing a productive lab, and becoming a respected member of the scientific community. Once this is achieved, most academic researchers busy themselves with worrying about their next grant application or find themselves drawn into the inevitable…

Use Your Brain or Lose It: A Conversation with Dr. John Ratey

Dr. John Ratey’s most recent book, A User’s Guide to the Brain, is one of the most accessible books available on recent brain research, what it means, and how to best make use of it. Ratey is professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the co-author of a number of books, including Shadow Syndromes,…

Mindful of Students’ Brains: An Interview with Eric Jensen

Two decades ago, Eric Jensen, who was then a middle and high school English teacher, participated in a workshop that, he says, “knocked my lights out.” And it changed his career. The workshop focused on ideas for educating young people based on information about how the brain works. Jensen says he was so impressed with…

A Marriage of Art and Learning: An Interview with James Catterall

Dr. James Catterall, professor at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education, says that his academic career has taken him down three main paths over the last few decades. The first was the examination of the economics of education, a pursuit that extended naturally from his undergraduate background in economics and from his graduate work at Stanford…

A Conversation With Robert Sapolsky

I first met Robert Sapolsky years ago at a research conference. My first impression was that he was quiet… too quiet. In a crowded hotel lobby with hundreds of scientists busily jabbering about themselves and their research, he seemed almost transparent. He didn’t talk much, took up very little personal space and seemed comfortable and…